Step Inside Tom Dixon’s New Coal Office Restaurant

British designer, Tom Dixon, has collaborated on a stylish new project in Kings Cross, London, with the opening of The Coal Office Restaurant.

Described as a place where you can experience fresh, creative food in a variety of beautifully designed and atmospheric spaces… it is here where the provenance is explained, the tableware is available to buy, and the recipes are shared!

Overlooking Granary Square, the all-day dining restaurant is the latest piece of the Dixon’s Coal Office jigsaw to be revealed. The Coal Office is the new home for Tom Dixon’s latest experiments, innovations and collaborations. It is an exciting new hub that will contribute to an ever-expanding network of creatives and technologists.

The 1851 brick warehouse now comprises Dixon’s flagship store, workshop and office, plus a restaurant with space for 160 diners, a chef’s table, bar and canalside roof terrace.

This Victorian building, which follows the curve of the canal, creates both a challenging and unusual dining layout for a restaurant.

Spread across three floors, the restaurant includes two outdoor terraces (one on the ground floor and one on the first floor), a bar, a bakery, two distinctively different dining areas and an open kitchen with dining counter where Granit’s menu of Mediterranean-style sharing plates is served.

Upstairs, the outdoor terrace offers sweeping views of the developing Kings Cross neighbourhood from Wilkinson Eyre’s Gasholders to Heatherwick Studio’s Coal Drops Yard.

Many of the building’s original features were retained following Dixon’s acquisition – including the industrial Victorian brickwork and windows.

In the restaurant, Dixon paired the building’s original brickwork and windows with granite countertops and his industrial-style designs pieces.

Fat’ bar stools flank the bar while his signature lighting pendants illuminate the interior. Dixon’s popular ‘Melt’ pendant lamps instantly greet guests in the first dining area, while his Top, Mirror Ball and Curve Ball lights also make appearances.

Marble tabletops in a variety of shades present Dixon-designed tableware, including rough hewn silver cutlery that is being tested on diners’ pre-production; the restaurant offers the perfect opportunity to test out new prototypes.

“Our goal is to constantly evolve and adapt the restaurant as new ideas materialise, with the intention to test more radical ideas in lighting, interior design, and tableware in tight collaboration with the chefs,” Dixon explains.

For more visit Tom Dixon.

Post seen on Living Etc to see more of the Coal Office Restaurant

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