Frank Gehry’s UTS Business School Gives Brick A New Identity

Frank Gehry’s UTS Business School Gives Brick A New Identity

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Image: www.dezeen.com Situated just south of Sydney’s central business district, the UTS Business School appears as a brick mountain amongst surrounding buildings. As the first Australian building designed by world-famous architect Frank Gehry, the school has become a prominent landmark within New South Wales. Known for his unorthodox designs, such as the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Guggenheim Bilbao, Gehry’s works are often cited as the most important works of contemporary architecture. And it’s for this reason that the University sought out Gehry. “We wanted an architect who could embody our contemporary approach to business education in the design of our new buildings,” said the Dean of the Business School, Professor Roy Green. The UTS Business School Inspires Students In a world where time constraints and building costs dictate one’s design, there is often very little room left for creativity. But despite this reality, Frank Gehry has managed to design a modern-day masterpiece. Based on the idea of a tree-house structure, Gehry’s design reflects a playful and childlike curiosity which inspires students to experiment with ideas and explore new perspectives. Gehry has described the UTS Business School as ‘a growing, learning organism with many branches of thought, some robust and some ephemeral and delicate.’ Brick Expressionism Gives Personality To Brick The UTS Business School may look like a ‘crumpled brown paper bag’ at first glance, but upon closer examination, it becomes much more than that. 320 000 custom bricks come together to form a striking structure, which shows the onlooker something new at every angle. It’s as if Gehry has formed the building on a potter’s turn table, and has moulded unique patterns into the brick surface. Slanted bricks jut out along the building’s serpentine lines, and undulating areas are decorated with a mosaic of highly reflective windows. Such carefully crafted details turn the inorganic into the organic and breathe a dynamic energy into the building. By using a seemingly inflexible material such as brick, to create a fluid structure, Frank Gehry has not only given the UTS Business School a creative and innovative edge, but he has also given brick a new identity.
Image: www.uts.edu.au
Image: www.uts.edu.au
Image: www.cfileonline.org
Image: www.cfileonline.org
 

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